Posts Tagged ‘Urban’

Water for cities …

The objective of World Water Day 2011 is to focus international attention on the impact of rapid urban population growth, industrialization and uncertainties caused by climate change, conflicts and natural disasters on urban water systems.

This year theme, Water for cities: responding to the urban challenge, aims to spotlight and encourage governments, organizations, communities, and individuals to actively engage in addressing the defy of urban water management.

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Did you know that …

1.      Water is everywhere—there are 332,500,000 cubic miles of it on the earth’s surface. Most of the water is in the ocean, >97% and it is salty and undrinkable. Less than 1 percent from total water amount is fresh and accessible.

2.      Much more fresh water is stored under the ground in aquifers than on the earth’s surface.

3.      Reservoirs of water include: the oceans, ice, atmosphere, groundwater, lakes, rivers and streams, and living things. Water moves between reservoirs at different rates and by different processes, including: evaporation, condensation, precipitation, transpiration, and the flow of water.

4.      Water in the stratosphere contributes to the current warming of the earth’s atmosphere. That in turn may increase the severity of tropical cyclones, which throw more water into the stratosphere. That’s the theory, anyway.

5.      The United States uses about 346,000 million gallons of fresh water every day.

6.      In developing countries, 70% of industrial waste is thrown straight into the water without any additional procedures for their purification.

7.      Every day, 2 million tons of human waste are disposed of in water courses.

8.      Over 1.5 billion people do not have access to clean, safe water.

9.      27% of the urban dwellers in the developing world do not have access to piped water at home.

10.   The relationship between water and cities is crucial. Cities require a very large input of freshwater and in turn have a huge impact on freshwater systems.

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